An expedition to Antarctica by an explorer from America has

Рубрика: Articles. Автор: admin. Понедельник 31 Окт 2011 в 4:34 дп

An expedition to Antarctica by an explorer from America has drawn attention to the solitary and mostly unexplored continent. Estimations of the land mass of Antarctica are that it approaches 5,000,000 square miles, all underneath a continental ice sheet, which is the largest on Earth. Certain individuals in the scientific community state that the ice cover has a thickness of 2,000 feet, though others are of the belief that it is even thicker than that. The very tallest mountain peaks and some land areas on the coast are the only areas to have escaped the ice. You can get the best antarctic tours information by visiting this website. Moving as a glacier to the sea, the ice travels in valleys between the high mountains. Mountainous regions serve as a buffer for the expansive central plateau on which the South Pole is found, and which rises 8,000 to 10,000 higher than sea level. Map makers have cut Antarctica into four separate areas named for northern seas or lands. You would know them as the African,, Pacific and American quadrants. The African and Pacific sectors have coastal areas which have gone essentially unexplored. Even the American quadrant has been investigated little. But the quadrant is relatively well-known. It contains the Ross Sea sector. The quadrant has the Ross Sea on its east, and then stretches west to Queen Mary Land. South Victoria Land, Oates Land, King George V Land, Adelle Land and Wilkes Land are all in the quadrant. Giant mountain peaks jut through the Ross Barrier, a slab of shelf ice measuring over 160,000 square miles. Read this site if you want cruises to antartica information. This is where the explorer set up his base camp. He was near a naturally formed harbor called the Bay of Whales. Two volcanoes fill Ross Island. They are called Mount Erebus and Mount Terror. From King Edward VII Land to the Ross Sea, the barrier travels for 400 miles. From the ocean to the mountainous regions, along the polar course, it is 400 miles wide. Only Antarctica is home to shelf ice, with the barrier being the biggest example of it. Covering an underwater portion of the Ross Sea section, the barrier is a creation of glacier arms which over the years rolled down from the high mountains. Traveling up for lengths of up to 100 miles, and through channels of between five and fifteen miles in width, ice still comes to the Ross Sea. Scientists don’t know if the Barrier is floating in the water or sitting on the bottom. The Ross Sea also serves as the Pacific quadrant’s western boundary. An area here called King Edward VII land sports impressive rock outcroppings. First seeing the Alexandra Mountains and the Scott Nunataks, the first explorer made a long flight from the Bay of Whales to the Pacific Quadrant. He was able to map fourteen new mountain peaks, as well as an island and saw hinterland that had yet to be seen. Subsequent flights would provide additional information regarding this sector and would possibly help geographers to create an accurate chart of the Pacific quadrant’s coastline. Explorers frequent the American quadrant’s Coats Land, Charcot Land and Graham Land, in addition to the Weddell sea area. Explorers flying over Graham Land were able to determine that it is an island, not part of the true land mass of the continent. Of major geographical concern is that the continent itself could very well be divided. Weddell Sea and Ross Sea are virtually opposite each other, the former being in the American quadrant and the latter in the quadrant. Unlimited research opportunities abound in Antarctica. Geographers want to finish mapping the coast, as well as the mountain ranges and polar plateau. Geologists are busy trying to study the land beneath the ice and understand how the glaciers have affected the land itself. An expedition to Antarctica by an explorer from America has drawn attention to the solitary and mostly unexplored continent. Estimations of the land mass of Antarctica are that it approaches 5,000,000 square miles, all underneath a continental ice sheet, which is the largest on Earth. Certain individuals in the scientific community state that the ice cover has a thickness of 2,000 feet, though others are of the belief that it is even thicker than that. The very tallest mountain peaks and some land areas on the coast are the only areas to have escaped the ice. You can get the best antarctic tours information by visiting this website. Moving as a glacier to the sea, the ice travels in valleys between the high mountains. Mountainous regions serve as a buffer for the expansive central plateau on which the South Pole is found, and which rises 8,000 to 10,000 higher than sea level. Map makers have cut Antarctica into four separate areas named for northern seas or lands. You would know them as the African,, Pacific and American quadrants. The African and Pacific sectors have coastal areas which have gone essentially unexplored. Even the American quadrant has been investigated little. But the quadrant is relatively well-known. It contains the Ross Sea sector. The quadrant has the Ross Sea on its east, and then stretches west to Queen Mary Land. South Victoria Land, Oates Land, King George V Land, Adelle Land and Wilkes Land are all in the quadrant. Giant mountain peaks jut through the Ross Barrier, a slab of shelf ice measuring over 160,000 square miles. Read this site if you want cruises to antartica information. This is where the explorer set up his base camp. He was near a naturally formed harbor called the Bay of Whales. Two volcanoes fill Ross Island. They are called Mount Erebus and Mount Terror. From King Edward VII Land to the Ross Sea, the barrier travels for 400 miles. From the ocean to the mountainous regions, along the polar course, it is 400 miles wide. Only Antarctica is home to shelf ice, with the barrier being the biggest example of it. Covering an underwater portion of the Ross Sea section, the barrier is a creation of glacier arms which over the years rolled down from the high mountains. Traveling up for lengths of up to 100 miles, and through channels of between five and fifteen miles in width, ice still comes to the Ross Sea. Scientists don’t know if the Barrier is floating in the water or sitting on the bottom. The Ross Sea also serves as the Pacific quadrant’s western boundary. An area here called King Edward VII land sports impressive rock outcroppings. First seeing the Alexandra Mountains and the Scott Nunataks, the first explorer made a long flight from the Bay of Whales to the Pacific Quadrant. He was able to map fourteen new mountain peaks, as well as an island and saw hinterland that had yet to be seen. Subsequent flights would provide additional information regarding this sector and would possibly help geographers to create an accurate chart of the Pacific quadrant’s coastline. Explorers frequent the American quadrant’s Coats Land, Charcot Land and Graham Land, in addition to the Weddell sea area. Explorers flying over Graham Land were able to determine that it is an island, not part of the true land mass of the continent. Of major geographical concern is that the continent itself could very well be divided. Weddell Sea and Ross Sea are virtually opposite each other, the former being in the American quadrant and the latter in the quadrant. Unlimited research opportunities abound in Antarctica. Geographers want to finish mapping the coast, as well as the mountain ranges and polar plateau. Geologists are busy trying to study the land beneath the ice and understand how the glaciers have affected the land itself.


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